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“The price of the shiny boots of a lawmaker might well be above my grandma's pension for a year"

11 April 2015
1453 reads
Anastasia NANI, Chief Editor of Anticoruptie.md web portal

 

Why don't the lawmakers want us to attend Parliament meetings? No, the reason is not that the journalists' skirts are shorter than the laymakers'; it isn't either that our presence would distract them from working hard on adopting laws for the sake of the people.
 
Why then? Because we make them feel uncomfortable; this means that they have something to hide. Because the price of the shiny boots of a Democrat lawmaker, for instance, might well be above my grandma's pension for a year. Because, say, the attire and gadgets of a Liberal Democrat might cost more than his whole declared income for a year. Because by observing a Communist and a Socialist exchanging whispers we could predict who would leave one faction in favor of another or perhaps we could witness the becoming of a new faction. Because a Liberal, for instance, might be caught on pictures in an embarrassing situation. Because they all might whisper to brew a scheme to dig into public funds. As we all well know, when it comes to money, the color of the party does not matter anymore.
Letting us, the journalists, into the meeting room could mean for many of them fewer chances of landing once again into the comfy leather seats in four years.

 

NOTE: the Independent Journalism Center (IJC) holds awareness raising events under the slogan “We Want Access into Parliament” on all days when Parliament holds plenary meetings. The Campaign aims to ensure free access of the media to Parliament meetings, so that the media can freely perform their duties.
 
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The We Want into Parliament! campaign is conducted within the Advocacy Campaigns Aimed at Improving Transparency of Media Ownership, Access to Information and Promotion of EU Values and Integration project, implemented by the IJC, which is, in its turn, part of the Moldova Partnerships for Sustainable Civil Society project, implemented by FHI 360.

 

Photo source: Constantin Grigorita